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Gatorade 1 Gallon Coolers 1-Gallon Cooler

$14.95 per 1-Gallon Cooler.

Gatorade 3 Gallon Coolers 3-Gallon Cooler

$49.95 per 3-Gallon Cooler.

Gatorade 48 Quart Ice Chests 48-Quart Ice Chest

$49.95 per 48-Quart Ice Chest.

Gatorade 5 Gallon Coolers 5-Gallon Cooler

$69.95 per 5-Gallon Cooler.

Gatorade 7 Gallon Coolers 7-Gallon Cooler

$79.95 per 7-Gallon Cooler.

Gatorade 10 Gallon Coolers 10-Gallon Cooler

$89.95 per 10-Gallon Cooler.

   
 

Gatorade Coolers & Ice Chests

Large orange Coolers & Ice Chests have become synonymous with Gatorade. Seen on the sidelines of sporting events for decades, these rugged Rubbermaid brand dispensers are a necessity when it comes to mixing up large quantities of Gatorade.

Our small and large Gatorade coolers are available in 1-gallon, 3-gallon, 5-gallon, 7-gallon and 10-gallon sizes, with the three larger sizes featuring a removable cup dispenser.

Whether you're outfitting a sports team or a work crew, Powder Mix Direct has all the Gatorade concentrates, coolers, paper disposable cups and accessories that you’ll need.

Gatorade Mixing Instructions

Whether you’re using powder mix or liquid concentrate, here’s the best way to mix up a large batch of ice cold Gatorade. Although many suggest adding ice in sealed bags or containers, so as not to dilute the Gatorade, we think our way is better.

When you look inside your cooler, you’ll notice that there are gallon markings on the sides. Let’s say you’d like to mix up 6-gallons of Gatorade. First, add the desired amount of fresh ice to a 7 or 10-gallon cooler. You can add an amount that reaches the 1, 2 or 3-gallon mark depending on the temperature of the water that you’ll be using. Now add either a 6-gallon pouch of powder mix or a 1-gallon bottle of liquid concentrate. Finally, add water until the level of the mixture reaches the 6-gallon mark.

Stir for several minutes until all of the ice has melted and you’ll end up with 6-gallons of ice cold Gatorade. Since you took the ice into account when you added the water, there won’t be any dilution. Hypothetically, if you add equal amounts of ice and water, the final temperature will be halfway between the temperature of the ice and the temperature of the added water.