Sqwincher Qwik Serv Packs

3 products

    3 products
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv Powder Stick Full Cases
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv Powder Stick Full Case - Fruit Punch
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv - Full Case
    Sqwincher
    $54.95
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv Powder Pack Half Cases
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv Powder Pack Half Case - Fruit Punch
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv - Half Case
    Sqwincher
    $28.95
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv Powder Packet Single Bags
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv Powder Packet Single Bag - Fruit Punch
    Sqwincher Qwik Serv - Single Bag
    Sqwincher
    $4.95

    Sqwincher Qwik Serv packs continue to grow in popularity. They feature a unique electrolyte blend which contains 50% less sodium and 50% more potassium.

    Mix each single-serve powder pack with 16.9 oz (.5 liter) of water for on-the-go hydration. Choose from Lemon Lime, Fruit Punch, Orange, Grape and Variety Packs exclusive to Powder Mix Direct.

    Since 1975, Sqwincher has been providing Professional Grade Hydration to both athletes and workers alike.

    Payment Options

    When it’s time to checkout we make it easy to pay. Most of our customers prefer to pay via credit card and we accept American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa. And for those looking for a more streamlined process, we now accept PayPal and Amazon Pay.

    If your company or organization prefers to be invoiced, we also accept purchase orders. Just select “Bill Me” as your payment option at checkout. You can then email or fax us a copy of your PO. If you’re a first-time customer we’ll contact you to set up terms.

    Driving Dehydrated Is Like Driving Drunk

    In 2015, researchers at Loughborough University studied the effects of dehydration on driving abilities. Using a driving simulator, eleven subjects first completed a series of tests in a fully hydrated state. Following a period of fluid restriction, they then completed the same tests in a slightly dehydrated state.

    Measured errors included lane drifting, late braking and crossing over rumble strips. When dehydrated, the subjects made a similar number of errors as when tested with blood alcohol levels in excess of legal limits. Even more concerning, however, is that the tested level of dehydration was relatively mild. The intent was to mimic a typical hectic day where the subjects had limited access to fluids.

    The study concluded that mild dehydration induced through short-term fluid restriction resulted in a significant increase in driving errors due to reduced concentration and slower reaction times.

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